orilu.com

beheading

ISIS brutes have beheaded a 100-year-old cleric - after accusing him of practising witchcraft

Home | Index of articles

---

Kakenya Ntaiya Is Fighting Female Genital Mutilation and Promoting Education Through the Kakenya Center for Excellence

When Kakenya Ntaiya was 12 years old, her best friend of the same age got married. Kakenya knew that she — like most of the girls in her community in southwestern Kenya — faced the same future. She was already engaged to her neighbor's son, and it was planned that they would marry after Kakenya had finished undergoing female genital mutilation (FGM).

Kakenya is a member of the Maasai tribe, found in Kenya and Tanzania, where FGM is commonly practiced. FGM, which is also known as female circumcision and female genital cutting, is the removal of some or all of the external female genitalia for non-medical reasons, sometimes with either a knife or a razor blade. Depending on the region, community, and custom, the procedure could consist of partial or total removal of the clitoris, or stitching up the opening of the vagina so that only a small hole remains for urine and menstrual blood and can only be opened through penetrative sex or surgery. It is very painful and can be dangerous, as every year a number of girls die from undergoing the procedure. Human rights organizations and even the United Nations have called for an end to the practice, and the Center for Reproductive Rights, a global legal advocacy organization, said that “the act itself is, at its essence, a basic violation of girls’ and women’s right to physical integrity and violates a number of recognized human rights. FGM is therefore increasingly being discussed and addressed in the context of girls’ and women’s rights, rather than as a strictly medical issue.” Health risks, according to the World Health Organization, can include infections (including tetanus), urinary problems, shock, increased risk of childbirth complications, and death.

The girls in Kakenya’s village were raised to expect FGM followed by early marriage for their future, with no continuation of their education. But Kakenya had a different idea, and she made a deal with her father: She would undergo FGM, but once she healed, instead of getting married, she would continue on with her education. Her father — expecting her to be ill for a long time after the procedure — agreed, and she underwent FGM. “You go through pain that you are not supposed to talk about,” she tells Teen Vogue. “But I thought, I need to talk about this and I wanted to talk about this.”

Though most girls take months to recover, her mother — who went to school for a few years when she was young — found a nurse who helped Kakenya recover from the pain and trauma more quickly. “My mom was smarter than many of the boys she went to school with [and] would say, ‘If I did not drop out of school, I would be a member of parliament, I would work in a bank,’” Kakenya says. “So we were not dropping out, we were not stopping. And she saw us as fulfilling her dream.”

Kakenya finished school and decided that she wanted to go to college in the U.S. It took some time for her to convince the local chief of her village that further education was a good idea, and that it would allow her to come back and help her community. No girl in her village had ever gone off to college before, let alone to the U.S., and she wanted her community’s support for both political and traditional reasons. If the chief and the elders had forbidden her to go, it would not only have been very hard for her to go but it also would have meant that she would be alienated from her community and even her family. Though she did receive a scholarship for her tuition and room and board at Randolph-Macon Women's College in Virginia (now the co-ed Randolph College), she still needed to pay for her travel there. Once she had the backing of the chief, members of her village rallied around her to raise money by selling items such as eggs and mangos. The support from her community was highly symbolic of their hopes and trust in Kakenya.

Shortly completing her bachelor’s degree at Randolph-Macon Women's College in 2004, Kakenya became a youth advisor for the United Nations Population Fund. She went on to earn a doctorate in education from the University of Pittsburgh in 2011.

Kakenya’s Dream

Throughout her education and over the 17 years she has spent in the U.S., her promise to the chief — and her community — was always at the back of her mind. “Every year I would go home, girls were getting married and I was thinking, ‘why?’” Kakenya, now 38, says. “And over the years, people were talking about girls’ education and FGM but it was not changing the story in my village.” So in 2008, she set up a boarding school for upper primary and lower secondary years (the equivalent of fourth through eighth grade), but with one major requirement: In order to attend, the girls’ parents or guardians had to promise that they would not force them to go through FGM or force them to be married, and the girls would also learn to become advocates against these harmful practices.

Kakenya got land just outside her village of Enoosaen, about 250 miles from Nairobi, in 2008, and the Kakenya Center for Excellence (KCE) opened the following year. That first cohort of girls are now about to graduate from high school, with KCE paying their school fees and supporting the girls financially through college as well. So far, the over 300 current students and alumnae have a 100% graduation rate from KCE, with a 0% rate of FGM and early marriage.

“With an education, a girl is more likely to be able to get a job, stand up for herself, and take on new opportunities,” Lakshmi Sundaram, the executive director of Girls Not Brides — a global organization advocating against child marriage across the globe, of which KCE is a member — wrote in an email to Teen Vogue. “She is more likely to decide if, when, and whom to marry.”

KCE, says Lakshmi, is more than simply a school: “It also provides a safe space for girls and supports them to learn about their rights, to build upon their skills, and to dream about their futures.”

‘Those Are Kakenya’s Daughters’

Prior to each new school year, hundreds of parents come with their daughters to the school hoping they will get one of the coveted 40 spots for Class Four (fourth grade). Choosing which girls are admitted is a tough process, and includes looking at exam scores as well as an interview process. But priority is given not only to kids at the top of their class, but also to those whose parents have passed away, whose parents have conditions such as HIV/AIDS, or who come from single-parent homes, particularly those who do not have mothers. “It is so hard and people will often say to us ‘you left out my kid, they deserve a chance,’” Selina Naiyoma, the deputy school director, tells Teen Vogue. “So we told Dr. Kakenya, maybe we can come up with more schools to take in more children.”

So this year, a new dorm is being built to house more girls. Kakenya is also in the middle of fundraising for a second school a few kilometers away that will go from nursery school all the way through high school. But until that happens and in order to expand girls’ empowerment and health, KCE each year runs weekend and weeklong camps for girls — and boys — from over 50 other schools, with teaching assistance that includes KCE students and alums.

Johnstone Shaai, a local pastor who sits on the KCE board, says girls get information at the camps that they would not have access to elsewhere. “They become agents of change,” he tells Teen Vogue. According to Selina, KCE students also stand out from other girls: “They walk in town and people say, ‘those are Kakenya’s daughters.’ You can easily see they are coming from this school because they carry themselves with confidence and no fear.”

The Ripple Effect

Naomi Ololtuaa, 16, is one of those girls. Sitting on purple plastic chairs in the front room of their simple three-room mud house — decorated with colorful beaded Maasai necklaces hanging from the ceiling and blue tinsel strung up on the walls — she and her father, David, discussed the importance of education. Naomi says that after she graduates from Form 4 (the equivalent to 12th grade) in December, she plans to apply to pre-med programs at universities in both the U.S. and Australia, and once she becomes a doctor, she wants to come back and build a clinic in the area so that the Maasai could have good access to healthcare. “There is a ripple effect,” she tells Teen Vogue, “because with my education, it will help many more people down the road.”

The Maasai — traditionally pastoralists whose wealth is counted in the number of cattle they keep — are known throughout the world as fierce fighters and hunters. But they are also a patriarchal society where girls are often only valued for the dowry they can bring for their family upon marriage. According to Kenya’s 2014 Demographic Health Survey, 90% of Maasai girls are married off by the age of 15 and 78% of women and girls between the ages of 15 to 49 have gone through FGM.

But David, in a break from tradition, has become a fighter for education, making sure that his 12 children from two different wives (many Maasai are polygamists) finish school and go on to university. “It is important to educate girls,” he said, “because many of them will take that education and come back to help their community.”

---

We are different. We, the adherents of Kreutz Ideology and Kreutz Religion, think that sex is the most important aspect in life. Everything else is just logistics.

---

Zimbabwe: Age of Consent to Go Up to 18 - Mnangagwa

8 MARCH 2017 - Allafrica

VICE PRESIDENT Emmerson Mnangagwa says government was in the process of introducing a law that would see the statutory age of consent to sex by girls raised from 16 to 18 years.

He was responding to calls by Senators on Tuesday that the minimum age one could be allowed to consent to sex should be aligned to a 2016 Constitutional Court ruling which outlawed the marriage of or among minors below 18.

While the ruling was followed with euphoric victory among child and women's rights activists, some felt it remained hollow as girls as young as 16 could still indulge in sex and even conceive children for as long as they did not proceed to get married before 18.

"We have a landmark ruling in this country which states that nobody should be married or be married off when they are below the age of 18," Senator representing people with disabilities, Anna Shiri, had said earlier.

She was contributing to a motion which called on the government to ratify and incorporate into its gender laws, the SADC Model Law on Eradicating Child Marriage.

Zimbabwe, currently, is in the process of enacting a law which seeks to operationalise the outlawing of child marriages.

"At the same time we have this Bill," Shiri said, "while we have part of the Act which says there is an age of consent to sex which is 16 years of age.

"As a result, there is some contradiction where early marriage is 18 years yet the consent to sexual activity is 16 years. We need to align these laws."

Mnangagwa, who was speaking as the country's justice minister, said government was considering raising the age of consent to 18.

"I may also say that the other two points you have raised relating to the issue of consent between juveniles or children, anybody who is below 18 is regarded as a child," Mnangagwa said.

"We had a Committee to deal with that and we have arrived at a possible solution which will come to Parliament on the issue of consent between an adult and juvenile or between a juvenile and a juvenile.

"Those issues we have debated and we believe that we should bring up also the age of consent to the age of 18. Of course, this is subject to debate when it comes to Parliament."

Mnangagwa said his ministry was in the process of aligning all the marriage laws and the progressive provisions of the SADC Model law he said will be incorporated in the comprehensive proposed Marriages Bill.

The proposed Bill will be able to amend the Marriages Act and the Customary Marriages Act and all other laws that are outdated in relation to marriages.

---


It is the secret dream of every Swedish or German woman to marry a black men, or at least have sex with a black man. Every smart young African man should migrate to Europe. Free money, nice house, good sex!

---

Germans introduce poison gas

On April 22, 1915, German forces shock Allied soldiers along the western front by firing more than 150 tons of lethal chlorine gas against two French colonial divisions at Ypres, Belgium. This was the first major gas attack by the Germans, and it devastated the Allied line.

Toxic smoke has been used occasionally in warfare since ancient times, and in 1912 the French used small amounts of tear gas in police operations. At the outbreak of World War I, the Germans began actively to develop chemical weapons. In October 1914, the Germans placed some small tear-gas canisters in shells that were fired at Neuve Chapelle, France, but Allied troops were not exposed. In January 1915, the Germans fired shells loaded with xylyl bromide, a more lethal gas, at Russian troops at Bolimov on the eastern front. Because of the wintry cold, most of the gas froze, but the Russians nonetheless reported more than 1,000 killed as a result of the new weapon.

On April 22, 1915, the Germans launched their first and only offensive of the year. Known as the Second Battle of Ypres, the offensive began with the usual artillery bombardment of the enemy’s line. When the shelling died down, the Allied defenders waited for the first wave of German attack troops but instead were thrown into panic when chlorine gas wafted across no-man’s land and down into their trenches. The Germans targeted four miles of the front with the wind-blown poison gas and decimated two divisions of French and Algerian colonial troops. The Allied line was breached, but the Germans, perhaps as shocked as the Allies by the devastating effects of the poison gas, failed to take full advantage, and the Allies held most of their positions.

A second gas attack, against a Canadian division, on April 24, pushed the Allies further back, and by May they had retreated to the town of Ypres. The Second Battle of Ypres ended on May 25, with insignificant gains for the Germans. The introduction of poison gas, however, would have great significance in World War I.

Immediately after the German gas attack at Ypres, France and Britain began developing their own chemical weapons and gas masks. With the Germans taking the lead, an extensive number of projectiles filled with deadly substances polluted the trenches of World War I. Mustard gas, introduced by the Germans in 1917, blistered the skin, eyes, and lungs, and killed thousands. Military strategists defended the use of poison gas by saying it reduced the enemy’s ability to respond and thus saved lives in offensives. In reality, defenses against poison gas usually kept pace with offensive developments, and both sides employed sophisticated gas masks and protective clothing that essentially negated the strategic importance of chemical weapons.

The United States, which entered World War I in 1917, also developed and used chemical weapons. Future president Harry S. Truman was the captain of a U.S. field artillery unit that fired poison gas against the Germans in 1918. In all, more than 100,000 tons of chemical weapons agents were used in World War I, some 500,000 troops were injured, and almost 30,000 died, including 2,000 Americans.

In the years following World War I, Britain, France, and Spain used chemical weapons in various colonial struggles, despite mounting international criticism of chemical warfare. In 1925, the Geneva Protocol of 1925 banned the use of chemical weapons in war but did not outlaw their development or stockpiling. Most major powers built up substantial chemical weapons reserves. In the 1930s, Italy employed chemical weapons against Ethiopia, and Japan used them against China. In World War II, chemical warfare did not occur, primarily because all the major belligerents possessed both chemical weapons and the defenses–such as gas masks, protective clothing, and detectors–that rendered them ineffectual. In addition, in a war characterized by lightning-fast military movement, strategists opposed the use of anything that would delay operations. Germany, however, did use poison gas to murder millions in its extermination camps.

Since World War II, chemical weapons have only been used in a handful of conflicts–the Yemeni conflict of 1966-67, the Iran-Iraq War of 1980-88–and always against forces that lacked gas masks or other simple defenses. In 1990, the United States and the Soviet Union signed an agreement to cut their chemical weapons arsenals by 80 percent in an effort to discourage smaller nations from stockpiling the weapons. In 1993, an international treaty was signed banning the production, stockpiling (after 2007), and use of chemical weapons. It took effect in 1997 and has been ratified by 128 nations.

---

Arthur Schopenhauer, the greatest German philosopher, on women: Only a male intellect clouded by the sexual drive could call the stunted, narrow-shouldered, broad-hipped and short-legged sex the fair sex … More fittingly than the fair sex, women could be called the unaesthetic sex. Neither for music, nor poetry, nor the plastic arts do they possess any real feeling of receptivity: if they affect to do so, it is merely mimicry in service of their effort to please.

---

Beyond Torture: The new science of interrogating terrorists

In the fall of 2003, Colonel Steven Kleinman, a veteran Air Force interrogator, walked into a room at a classified location near Baghdad. It was dark and the walls were painted black, he recalls. A Marine and an interpreter sat side by side in chairs. In front of them knelt an Iraqi man squinting into a spotlight. The Marine was asking the Iraqi questions, and each time he answered, the interrogator slapped him hard and called him a liar. Shocked, Kleinman pulled the Marine out of the room and asked what he was doing. “Sir,” he responded, “that’s the only way to get these people to talk. That field manual shit isn’t going to work here.”

That “field manual shit” is the guidebook for military interrogators listing techniques they’re authorized to use in questioning detainees. What’s known as the Army Field Manual was created in 1945 and is now in its third edition; it plays a pivotal role in U.S. counterterrorism policy. Soon after Barack Obama moved into the Oval Office in 2009, he issued an executive order that required all U.S. government interrogators to abide by the manual, which prohibits waterboarding, prolonged sleep deprivation and other “enhanced interrogation techniques” used by the CIA after 9/11. The agency had already stopped using those methods due to their controversial nature, but Obama formally ended the program, which the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence said “was not an effective means of acquiring intelligence.”

Torture still has its champions, however, and executive orders can easily be revoked. To prevent future administrations from returning to harsh measures, Senators Dianne Feinstein and John McCain are now proposing legislation that would establish the field manual as the law of the land. The bill will likely receive a vote in the next week and is expected to pass.

Yet the manual is largely useless, according to Kleinman and two other experts involved with the High-Value Detainee Interrogation Group (HIG), a body set up by Obama to question terrorism suspects and sponsor related research. The reason, they say, is because it’s unscientific. As new legislation works its way through the congressional pipeline, Kleinman and other HIG researchers say the U.S. needs to rethink how interrogators are trained—based on a bevy of recent empirical research. “The time is ripe for the Army Field Manual to be redesigned,” says Melissa Russano, a professor at Roger Williams University in Bristol, Rhode Island, who has contributed to various HIG-funded projects. “The costs of not doing so are incredibly high.”

Flatter the DetaineeThis isn’t the first time Kleinman has tried to change American interrogation protocols. More than a decade ago, as the Iraqi insurgency grew, and the Pentagon pushed for new intelligence, he watched as American interrogators—like that Marine in Iraq—turned to brutal and humiliating measures. The reason, Kleinman believes, is because many of the methods in the Army Field Manual didn’t work. When a scandal emerged about the treatment of prisoners at the Abu Ghraib detention center in Iraq, the Bush administration decided to revise the manual for the first time in decades. The new version placed restrictions on abuse, but “there was no effort to objectively test the efficacy of the approaches,” Kleinman says. The former Air Force interrogator testified before Congress in 2007, insisting the manual be replaced. But his proposals were ignored.

Since the creation of HIG in 2009, research on interrogation has grown steadily. One paper, a controversial 2010 survey Kleinman wrote along with Susan Brandon, now the HIG’s chief research scientist, analyzed the efficacy of the manual’s techniques. But the unclassified, 100-page document was never published, Kleinman says, because its conclusions could have jeopardized the HIG’s relationship with the military.

Now, however, with McCain and Feinstein pushing for new legislation, Kleinman, Brandon and their co-authors, Sujeeta Bhatt and Brandi Justice, agreed to let Newsweek review the survey, which detailed how the majority of the manual’s techniques are flawed. One involves belittling prisoners. Another recommends asking ominous questions, such as: “You know what can happen to you here?” Techniques like these “are very ineffective,” says Mark Fallon, a former federal agent and chair of the HIG’s Research Committee. These methods, along with other stress-inducing techniques, can impair memory and contaminate intelligence, according to Kleinman’s survey. “I don’t want to force people to tell me things,” he says, “because then they will tell me things they don’t even know.”

Some of the manual’s methods seem to work well, namely flattering a detainee, asking direct questions and developing a rapport with a prisoner. Russano says recent research indicates that showing empathy, respect and humanity help elicit reliable information. In one study, she and her colleagues interviewed more than 40 experienced interrogators to establish which techniques they found most effective. A majority cited building rapport. Though popular television shows, such as 24, and movies, such as Zero Dark Thirty, portray torture and other coercive measures as effective, “interrogation is not as Hollywood makes it to be,” says Ali Soufan, a former FBI agent who now runs a private intelligence firm.

Soufan witnessed this firsthand while interrogating the CIA’s high-value detainee, Abu Zubaydah, at a secret prison in Thailand in 2002. As Newsweek previously reported, Zubaydah had been shot multiple times during his capture and was in bad shape. Soufan and his colleague, Steve Gaudin, tended to his wounds, gained his trust and got him talking. Among other crucial information, Zubaydah told them Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was the mastermind of the 9/11 attacks—something previously unknown. The CIA later employed brutal tactics such as waterboarding, in an effort to get Zubaydah to divulge more. But the agency’s harsh measures failed to gain useful intelligence, according to the Senate report.

One of Soufan’s most effective tactics was to convince a detainee he knew more than he really did. In Zubaydah’s case, the detainee was initially pretending his name was “Daoud.” But Soufan had spent time going over the FBI’s intel files; he surprised Zubaydah by calling him “Hani,” a nickname used by his mother. A similar technique was pioneered by Hanns Scharff, a legendary German interrogator during World War II. Scharff subtly convinced prisoners that he knew everything about them; the prisoners, in turn, would feel there was no point in hiding information. In a new study shared with Newsweek, Pär-Anders Granhag, a researcher at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, and his colleagues tried out Scharff’s method by interviewing volunteers suspected of a mock crime. The study found that the suspects were less likely to withhold information they believed the interrogator already had.

Sometimes, however, using evidence in that way can backfire. The field manual, for instance, recommends a technique that’s broadly similar to the Scharff method but inferior in key respects, says Granhag. In the manual’s version, called “We Know All,” an interrogator is supposed to use evidence aggressively, providing answers if a detainee hesitates or refuses to reply. This approach bears some resemblance to the Reid Technique, a method routinely used by police departments in the U.S. and Canada. It involves presenting suspects with such overwhelming evidence that they feel forced to admit guilt. Yet research by Russano and others suggests this approach, if taken too far, can pressure innocent people into giving false confessions. Subtlety, Soufan says, is key. “It’s not like ‘I know you have WMD, and tell me where they are!’”

Granhag agrees: “For Scharff, information should be evoked, never demanded.”

A Back Door to Torture

Many interrogators say training needs to put more emphasis on rapport-building techniques and continue to reject torture. But Fallon says the current version of the Army Field Manual still offers a back door to some of the brutal tactics authorized after 9/11. As the CIA applied its enhanced techniques at secret prisons around the world, the Pentagon developed a parallel set of harsh measures for use at the U.S. prison at Guantánamo Bay. Although the current manual bans some harsh tactics such as the use of attack dogs, others might still be permissible.

At issue is a special appendix at the end of the manual, laying out a “restricted interrogation technique” called “Separation.” This involves placing a prisoner in isolation for 30 days or more, and it can be used only on “unlawful enemy combatants” not protected by the Geneva Conventions, a set of international agreements that lay down standards for the humane treatment of prisoners. The goal of this method is to decrease the “detainee’s resistance to interrogation” and to prolong the “shock of capture.” If detainees cannot be physically isolated in cells, interrogators are permitted to apply goggles and earmuffs; and captives must be allowed a minimum of four hours sleep every 24 hours.

Kleinman and Fallon think this technique could be interpreted to permit cruel methods, such as prolonged solitary confinement and sleep and sensory deprivation. Kleinman’s 2010 survey lists a myriad of mental and physical problems caused by solitary confinement, such as depression, psychosis and impaired memory. The United Nations echoed those concerns in a recent report, which said the appendix could facilitate cruel treatment or even torture. In 2010, Fallon, Kleinman and others penned a joint letter to then-Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, criticizing the separation tactic. They say they never received a reply. (Gates tells Newsweek he does not recall receiving the letter.) In a statement, a spokesman for the Defense Department said that by law, “no person in DoD custody or control shall be subject to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment."

Not all interrogators think the appendix, or the manual for that matter, needs to be changed. Mike Nemerouf, a former sergeant in the U.S. Army, says the authorized list of tactics “does a great job of identifying primary motivators for detainees.” He also defended the appendix, saying separation “creates an atmosphere that is more conducive to collecting accurate and complete intelligence information” and contains numerous safeguards to rule out abuse. Charles Mink, a former U.S. Army interrogator, believes the appendix should be removed, but otherwise supports the manual. “Its contribution is that it bans abuse,” he says. “It needs to be legislation before the American people inaugurate their next president.”

The latter point is something with which both Fallon and Kleinman agree. They firmly support the bill, which orders a periodic review of the field manual. “Passing strongly worded legislation that would stand as a bulwark against torture,” Kleinman says, “is the single most important step we must take.”

---

Socrates, clearly recognized as a wise man, stated that women have no place in public life. And right he was.

---

Indecent sexual affair in the offices of the Socialist Party in Albania

Tirana, August 18, 2014/Independent Balkan News Agency

The discovery of the suspected pedophile Agron Cane, former brigadier commander

Agron Cane, a former 61 year old military officer and brigadier commander, had been part of the Socialist Party for a while. He worked at the office of MP Kokedhima in Saranda, where he used to take note of the demands coming from the citizens, mainly for jobs and complaints and he also filled the necessary documents to help them.

One of the persons who also sought help at the office of the Socialist Party was O.G, a widow, mother of four children, who suffered constant poverty in Saranda. Since the month of March, she was trying to find a job, but the secretary of the socialist MP didn’t consent to this if she didn’t offer him a sexual favor. The situation escalated when the unscrupulous official asked her to offer him his 14 year old daughter for sexual relations. He demanded to take the virginity off the young girl and engage in an orgy along with her mother in bed. The woman said that she was very upset by this, but she didn’t trust police and this is why she didn’t demand help there. A few days ago, while the situation was aggravating, she addressed to a local journalist. This marked the start of a series of registrations which revealed for the public other ugly aspects of officials who deal with the problems of the citizens.

It’s easily discerned by the conversation that the woman has had sexual relations with the pervert, but forced to do so. But, Cane was now asking for more, an orgy with the child. An outrageous part where Cane claims that next year he would run for the mayor of Saranda was this one: “I, you and the girl will all three be in bed. Under your guidance, she will be your student. So, phone her, as I’m looking forward to her. I’m obsessed by your daughter. Her friends have done this before her. I can assure you on this. She will be relieved because she has many hormones. The girl needs sex. I’m not a maniac, as I have a wife at home. I like good things and I take pleasure on doing this. I don’t want to say a lot, but if I’m elector mayor, your daughter will have a future”.

State Police reacted by arresting the suspect, Agron Cane, married, father of two children.

Kokedhima condemns the “maniac act”

The socialist MP, Kokedhima reacted after the event and said that “the ugly act and implication of Agron Cane in this story is strongly condemned”.

“We distance ourselves from such ugly perverse acts”, said Kokedhima.

In the press statement, the MP also published for the first time, the full identity of the woman who became an object of abuse in the office of the SP. Media and police had kept her name discreet.

This also shows that party offices are used for employments: “The woman who denounced this, came to our office at the start of the year in order to find a job and our office helped her to get a job at a private company in Saranda, where she worked for six months…”

Who is Kokedhima

Since the ‘90s, Koco Kokedhima became known after privatizing several state owned enterprises, thus becoming one of the biggest business people in Albania. In 1997 he entered the world of media when he founded the daily “Shekulli” newspaper, which soon became the biggest one in Albania and held this position for several years. Kokedhima also opened a national radio channel and a TV channel, and also a sport newspaper, a photographic agency, magazines, publishing houses, etc. Besides the media, he also bought a football team. During this period, he started the radio talk show called “How to become a millionaire”. Kokedhima claims that his wealth is estimated to amount to several hundred millions of Euros. Kokedhima is also known as one of the closest friends of the prime minister. Kokedhima entered politics in 2013, when he ran as an MP of the Socialist Party for the south of Albania.

Berisha: The pedophile is Kokedhima’s closest man

Former prime minister and current MP of the Democratic Party, Sali Berisha says that “the pedophile Agron Cane is Kokedhima’s closest man. By using Kokedhima’s power and SP in Saranda, he asks the mother of four orphan children to offer him his daughter for sexual relations in exchange of a job”, Berisha says that after this scandal, “Rama-Kokedhima did everything with police and SP to shut the media up and end this scandal. After they failed, Rama, in violation with every law, sent Kokedhima to put pressure on the young girl during her interrogation at the police of Saranda”.

Berisha criticizes what he considers to be as Rama’s silence: “Although in this super scandal everything had developed the same as in horror films, Rama keeps quiet to convey a message to socialists and common citizens that this is his model of employment and solution to their problems”.

Rama: Evil has no place among us

Immediately after this, prime minister Edi Rama reacted on this event. He stresses the fact that police arrested the suspect and that the office of MP Kokedhima categorically distanced itself. Rama said that the 61 year old was expelled from the Socialist Party, by adding: “For us, evil has no party and no place among us”.

MPs, active in condemning the scandal

MP Albina Deda says that “one must offer money or sexual favors, or to have a serious previous conviction to get a job”, adding: “It’s clear that the state offices, the offices of the Socialist Party have turned into offices of abuse and perversity”.

MP Alban Zeneli says that this phenomenon has turned into a system: “Kokedhima’s assistant, who demands sexual favors from the minor in exchange of a job, is the creature of a system established by Edi Rama”. According to him, “the entire society is irritated and has raised its voice for the dirty stuff taking place in the office of the Socialist Party”.

Analysts offer their insights

Analyst Andi Bushati says that “the terrible scenes of a 61 year old who asks to have sex with a minor in the offices of the Socialist Party, are not only an object of anger for thousands of hopeless unemployed people, who live on the verge of poverty, who want a job and more opportunities in life, but it’s also a reflection of the situation in which we’re in, a great moment of reflection which tells us about our society, for its darkest side and for the weak links that tie the relations between this society with the people that govern it.”

Bushati says that “that part of the declaration issued by Kokedhima, which talks about the woman that has denounced this story, is outrageous. In a perverse manner, the woman’s name is revealed, something which has been done neither by police, nor by the media. They “forget” that she’s the mother of four children, who lives in a small town, where everyone knows everyone. In a more disgusting manner, the declaration says that the woman has been found a job by the SP office before. What does this mean: that she has found the job based on the services that she has offered (a low insinuation)? Or is this being done to show that even now, after the event, with more publicity and attention, people must continue to knock in the local offices of the SP because they can solve their problems there?”.

Analyst, Mero Baza, criticizes the regards that Kokedhima shows for the past of the pedophile and suggests: “Kokedhima should have denounced the crime after he was made aware and hand the criminal to police. After this, he should have offered a strong public apology, not because he was guilty, but because he was responsible for the people that he imposed upon us to govern our fate. The citizens of Saranda have not voted the pervert, neither his career as a military man or his vices as a pedophile, but the Socialist Party. Today, they have no explanation why their party trusted the fate of the citizens to a pervert. Nevertheless, the only thing that makes sense is the public apology. It’s a sign of humbleness and unification with the revolted citizens. The justification with his past as an officer, causes more irritation”.

Baze says that the scandal reveals how power is executed in the Socialist Party’s base. “Power is delegated to several informal offices, which receive letters and complaints and use them for personal power. The scandal turns down what the government has claimed about recruitments at the party’s base, standards of recruitment and quality of those who recruit. The pervert was not an employee of a job center in Saranda, but an employ of Koco’s office, who formally is a volunteer without pay, but who has more power than whoever works in job offices”.

Baze further suggests that “Koco Kokedhima is not to be blamed why a sexual pervert was found among the voluntaries, but he’s responsible for delegating power in an informal way, outside the structures of the state. We have job offices for employment, we have the municipality for complaints and we have police to report corruption… The parallel state of the MP is the start of the problem which fuels the courage to abuse up to this level of perversity”.

Publicist Nidela Hoxha Zenuni told IBNA that “every day we have to deal with such people, in work premises and everywhere else”. “Under the disguise of a normal man, who is often presented as a good man, lie scary monstrosities and perversities”. The publicist says that “pedophiles of such dimensions who circulate in high levels of society, show a high level of sophisticated criminality, and at the same time, an ordinary one”. /ibna/

---


95 percent of the victims of violence are men. Because women are natural cowards who send men to handle things when they are dangerous.

---

Five types of orgasms you never knew women could have – and how to give them to her

While a man’s orgasm is pretty straight forward, a woman’s orgasm is complex in that it can be achieved in many different ways.

Five ways to be exact. There are five main types of orgasm for women, the main two being the clitoral and the vaginal (G-spot).

While we have previously explained the difference in feel between the vaginal and clitoral orgasms, there are several other kinds of orgasms that are different altogether.

Here’s how to give her five different kinds of orgasms – and blow her mind in the process.

1. A-spot

The A-spot, or the Anterior fornix erogenous zone, is located deep inside the vagina about two to three inches higher than the G-spot and behind the cervix.

If you manage to find this zone, it can lead to “overwhelming orgasms” that radiate across the pelvis and down the legs.

2. U-spot

The U in U-spot stands for urethral opening. If the area around a woman’s U-spot is gently caressed this can get them going.

The best way to go about this is with soft touches rather than strong pressure and when the area is well lubricated. Another way to stimulate this area is for the man to run the head of his penis from the entrance of the vagina up to the clitoris and back.

3. Eargasm

While this kind of orgasm isn’t genital-based, it is a real, tangible thing. ASMR (autonomous sensory meridian response) is a sensation that spreads from the scalp down the back of the neck, across the shoulders and down the spine.

So how can you achieve this? By listening to certain soft, crackling sounds through headphones. A good place to start is on the WhispersRed ASMR channel on Youtube.

And here are some tips for the regualr orgasms:

4. Clitoral

This is the most common way for women to orgasm, the clitoris contains 8,000 nerve endings – twice that of a penis – and is actually nine centimetres long but only the tip is visible to the naked eye.

Some studies suggest 94% of women need clitoral stimulation in order to orgasm, but direct contact can sometimes be uncomfortable so make sure to massage it and listen to her instructions as to what feels good.

5. Vaginal (G-spot)

To find the G-spot, you will need to look one to two inches inside the vagina on the front wall – towards the belly button.

In some women there will be a small patch of tissue there that feels rougher or puffier than the surrounding flesh.

This area responds to firm stimulation and motions and can be hit during intercourse.

---

Women shit and stink, most are fat and ugly. Women carry diseases that afflict good men, and when they have the opportunity, they fuck with somebody else. Time to replace women with sophisticated robots.

---

Got the balls? Men are super-sizing their testicles with this bizarre new procedure

Daily Star

Most lads worry about the look and feel of their penis, which can make them less confident in the sack. But now men are shifting attention away from their schlongs and towards their scrotums.

A certain testicle-boosting injection is the latest cosmetic surgery fad that lads are flocking to have – and forking over £2,800 in the process.

The procedure involves squirting botox into the scrotum – leading the trend to be dubbed “scrotox” and “balltox” – in a bid to get a lower hanging and more relaxed-looking ballsack.

Scrotox doesn’t just decrease sweating and reduce the wrinkled appearance of lads’ testicles, it also boosts their size.

It seems men are paying more and more attention to their looks and the number of guys going under the knife in the quest for beauty has doubled in the last decade.

But scrotox isn’t the only bizarre cosmetic operation to hit the market, with men also seeking to increase their girth down below by injecting their own fat into their schlongs.

The procedure takes around 45 minutes and will set you back £4,500 but you have abstain from sex for six weeks to let the penis heal.

As for the results of the manhood makeover, don’t expect to stretch more than one inch wider than you were before.

Speaking exclusively to Dailystar.co.uk, certified plastic surgeon Dr David Alessi explained the long-term effects of the procedure are often less than desirable.

“Unfortunately, upwards of 90% of men are dissatisfied with the results,” he said.

The medic, who founded the Alessi Institutes and Face Forward, a charity offering free procedures for victims of domestic abuse, warned that lads’ obsession with penis size could be a symptom of a serious psychological problem.

He said: “Most men who think they have a small penis actually don’t.

"Studies vary, but research suggests that the average erect penis ranges from under five inches to just under six inches.

“Most men who think their penis is too small have penis dysmorphic syndrome and would be better off seeing a shrink and not a surgeon.”

---

Dictatorship is the only honest political system. Rulers rule for their own benefit, or maybe (maybe!) the interests of a ruling class. That is why warlordism is the political system of the future.

---

Home | Index of articles